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My methods for making are forged by my dance training in improvisational and experimental techniques, my own collage practices, and my obsession with material forms, thus fixing my interest in the possibilities of each medium I work within. I am drawn to movement practices that exhaust, challenge, and disrupt form, often working improvisationally or towards a goal of sensation. Similarly, I approach visual collaging by utilizing sensation-based process and improvisational choice-making to relate to my collage materials via texture, color, and composition. Thus, I see my dance-making and image-making as the same; a distilling process that fluctuates medium but is grounded in kineticism and embodied sensation.

 

My making is deeply directed by experiences of trauma, leading me to creatively consider concepts such as dissociation, false memory, catharsis, fog, and rage. I find clarity in making messes and work to overlay my embodied and material practices, inviting chaos, mistakes, and traces of my hands-on engagement with my collage and choreographic materials to invite viewers to imagine what it may have felt like to make it or perform it. The choreography prioritizes sensation over shape, often with a goal of disorientation, exhaustion, or physicalized multi-tasking. Billowing sweeps of torso and limbs gain momentum and accentuate weightedness, then quickly dissolve into frictitious gestural rhythms. The collection of these moments often build assymmetrical and multi-layered collage experiences with hyper-saturated amounts of movement, texture, sensation, frequency, and emotion.
 

I use these processes as a tactic of survival and trust them to bring challenge, healing, and resolution to my life. They help me process, sift, and situate myself in relationship to a post-trauma moving body, a lineage of artistic mentors, and myself in the world. I believe in the revelatory possiblities that movement, performance, art-making and witnessing can catalyze and do this work to hold space for such potentials.